Time to Eat the Dogs

On Science, History, and Exploration

Field Notes: Naryan-Mar

Waterfront at midnight in Naryan-Mar, 24 June 2010

The town of Naryan-Mar sits at the apex of the Pechora River delta in the Russian European Arctic. It is the capital of the Nenets Autonomous Okrug (NAO), a Florida-sized region of tundra and taiga at 69° N.

Pechora River Basin. The Pechora flows north into the Barents Sea. Its watershed extends east to the Ural Mountains (bottom right)

In late June, I attended the Arctic Perspectives XXI conference in Naryan-Mar along with participants from Russia, Finland, Canada, and the U.S. We represented many fields: history, geography, anthropology, medicine, and Arctic studies.

Flying into Naryan Mar reminded me of flying into Barrow Alaska at 71° N: both are set in flat landscapes, surrounded by green, marshy tundra that extends to the horizon. Thousands of lakes and ponds mark both regions, and in Naryan-Mar, the Pechora River and its tributaries coil and swirl their way north,  like some vast design from the Book of Kells.

Pechora River near the northern delta, 68 N latitude.

Pechora River near the northern delta, 68 N latitude.

Once on the ground, though, it was easy to see the differences between the two towns. The population of Naryan Mar is three times larger than Barrow (which is just over 5,000). Naryan Mar has trees, albeit small ones, while Barrow — at least the Barrow I remember visiting in 2004 – has few life forms apart from dogs, residents, and tundra.

Both cities have benefited from the oil economy of the Arctic, but Naryan-Mar shows the flush of oil money: a new civic center, flat-screen public displays, a new cultural center, and a significant port center.

Downtown Naryan Mar at 1 am

Naryan-Mar also feels more European. While 61% of Barrow residents are Inupiat, only 11% of the NAO are Nenets, the reindeer-herding people who have inhabited this region since the 12th century.  (I could not find any demographics for Naryan-Mar itself, but it seemed to follow this ratio). 67% of Naryan-Mar residents are Caucasian.

The conference sessions presented some terrific work — on polar medicine, energy competition and independence, Arctic nationalism, ecology, and history —  yet the differences among the papers made it difficult to find threads strong enough to hold them all together thematically.

Lassi Heininen (University of Lapland) giving lecture translated by Olga Zhitova

Ultimately, though, the conference succeeded less as a place to exposit work than to explore ideas.  I offered an paper on the methodology of studying Arctic exploration (which I will present in a later post), a subject that may have been relevant to — at most — one or two other participants. And I did not hear any papers that had a direct bearing on my current work.

Victor Dmitriev (Arctic and Antarctic Institute, St Petersburg) giving a toast.

But the papers – and especially the participants – made a deep impression on me. The feeling of otherness that I described in my last post on Moscow seemed to be reversed in Naryan-Mar. I was surrounded by scholars who love the Arctic, who come to it from different countries and different perspectives, and who desired to communicate their work (and something of themselves) to their peers.

Nenets elder welcomes us to Bugrino settlement, Kolguev Island

Leaving Kolguev Island, Barents Sea, 71 degrees N. latitude

I will never forget it.

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1 Comment»

  fran wrote @

Loved the photo of the waterfront at sunset. It’s Thomas Cole and Charles Sheeler combined–the Sublime of an Industrial Revolution…What a conference; sounds awesome.


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