Time to Eat the Dogs

On Science, History, and Exploration

Film Review: Avatar

Jake Sully on patrol in his Na'vi avatar

As I went to see Avatar last week, I felt resigned. It had all of the predictors of a bad movie.

First, it cost half a billion dollars to make. This may seem promising. What film wouldn’t benefit from vast sums to improve cast, scripts, and special effects? Yet big budgets are usually the death of good films because studios become obsessed with recovering their investments. The question of “how do we make a good film” becomes eclipsed by “how do we make a film that brings in 500 million dollars of audience?” The recipe for this is well known: find big name actors, put them in a romance story which doubles as an action film, and sprinkle liberally with special effects. Toy merchandising helps too.

Second, Avatar was developed as a 3-D computer graphics film, only occasionally including scenes with human actors. While CGI has revolutionized film-making, it has often been used indiscriminately, creating scenes that are ill-conceived, implausible, or – with hundreds of moving points of animation – impossible to watch. George Lucas is the poster-child for CGI abuse. The coherence and narrative tension of the original Star Wars series was no where to be found in the prequel episodes of the last decade, as the demands of the blue-screen eclipsed plot, drama, and character development.

CGI abuse: Attack of the Clones (2002)

Third, Avatar follows two of the most cliched genres in films: it is coming-of-age movie, a bildungsroman in space, and a “going native” story where the lead, Jake Sully (Sam Worthington), a paraplegic marine, finds meaning in life by becoming a member of  “primitive” tribe, the Na’vi on the planet of Pandora. This feat is made possible by the creation of a Na’vi avatar that Sully inhabits for most of the film. (To see how easily Avatar maps on to other ‘going native’ films, see these mashups here and here of Avatar & Disney’s Pocahontas)

Jake Sully tests out his Na'vi avatar

So I was surprised that I really like this movie. The millions of dollars used in production and marketing have not corrupted the soul of Avatar. Credit for this goes to director, James Cameron, who has proven capable of directing massively expensive, CGI intensive films (Terminator, Aliens, and Titanic) without surrendering plot and coherence.

As for the CGI effects, they are stunning to behold. The planet of Pandora is rendered with brilliant color and movement, texture and imagination. The ten-foot tall Na’vi – who in the real universe would already have been recruited for the NBA, move with all of the grace of real humans, or rather, humanoids. After a few minutes, I forgot I was watching CGI, or more accurately, I forgot about the distinction between CGI and “real life.” This is a clever effect since the viewer is, in a sense, recapitulating Sully’s experience with his avatar.

Life on Pandora

Most importantly, the story of Jake Sully’s assimilation into the world of the Na’vi, while predictable, is not mawkish. It isn’t hard to believe that a man who has lost the use of his legs, spent six years in space, and no longer functions within the world of the Marines, would find running and flying through wilds of Pandora exhilarating.

Indeed, it is the idea of the avatar that keeps this ‘going native’ story interesting. Other films in this genre, from Apocalypse Now to Dances With Wolves, follow men as they cut themselves off from the world left behind. By contrast, Avatar follows Sully as he moves back and forth between worlds: his avatar existence with the Na’vi and his human existence in base camp. How does one go native if there is constant access to the world one is leaving? The moral conflict which results provides Avatar with much of its narrative tension.

Marlon Brando goes native in Apocalypse Now (1979)

Finally, Avatar proves three-dimensional in another sense, by taking this theme of remote connection beyond the story of Sully and the Na’vi. The Marines on Pandora have found their own avatars of sorts, in the weaponized “Amplified Mobility Platform” or AMP (which bears more than a passing resemblance to the cargo loader operated by Sigourney Weaver in Aliens).

Wheelchair meets AMP

The Na’vi, on the other hand, are able to link, through neuro-chemical connections to other beings on Pandora. Indeed, the planet itself operates as an organic neural network. Avatars, in other words, have many incarnations and, in their most developed states, begin to emulate a kind of Gaia or world-soul. At what point does neural connectivity cross the line into spirituality? While Avatar sometimes crosses the line into a preachy environmentalism, the bigger questions that it raises make it worth the ride.

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8 Comments»

  darwinsbulldog wrote @

Thanks for your thoughts, Michael – I have yet to see the film!

  Phil wrote @

Interesting take on the film. I never got the same sense of tension that I felt should have been present as Worthington’s character slowly began to disassociate himself from his former life. On the other hand, you do bring up an interesting point about avatars and connectivity. Cameron’s slant was clearly towards the environment, but on the other hand, avatars, connectivity, and the exchange of a shared knowledge or experience holds all kinds of meaning in this age of social networking. Nice comments on the film.

  river wrote @

thanks for the review. i have yet to see the film, and have the same sense of resignation you mention at the beginning. i am very annoyed with exactly the aspects of the film you describe–the cliches and reliance on big effects. i may need to see it to find out if my dislike is justified. i’m afraid i’ll end up liking it, though, and have to give up my grouchiness at this monstrosity of hollywood excess and ego.

  Kabir wrote @

Nice Review…Avatar is an interesting experience looks great as a treat but is quite hollow inside.

  ArchAsa wrote @

We have babysitters for Thursday, when we will try to see the movie, my hubby and me. I try to go in with as low expectations as possible, just looking for a few hours of pure entertainment. You have given me some hope that I will indeed receive this for my hard earned money. I like big effects and great visual experience in a movie theatre – for thoughtful story telling I might as well rent it more cheaply on DVD and enjoy it in my home without stupid people around me.

  Michael Robinson wrote @

@Asa: I think this is one to see on the big screen, whether you end up liking it or not. I’ll be curious to hear what you think, especially on the anthropological stuff (of which there is a lot).

  Kenneth Miles wrote @

I can honestly say that never in my life have I seen a movie that I did not like, yet wholeheartedly recommend! What an unusual paradox. I found James Cameron’s story utterly ridiculous, but undeniably visually stunning. This production has effectively advanced the medium of filmmaking by leaps and bounds. Leave your brain at home and just see it – there’s really nothing more to say.

  river wrote @

i keep hearing comments like this last one from kenneth, and it makes me feel even more grumpy and turned off from seeing the movie. narrative movie-making *is* story-telling, so an amazing visual spectacle that is devoid of a good tale is the epitome of hollywood’s disregard for our intelligence and humanity.

i remain on the fence about whether to see it, but man does it irk me. ba. humbug.


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